Disability and Employment

In our previous blog posts, we covered the growing concern over the lack of disabled access throughout the UK and Ireland and the negative impact it is having on families and the overall disabled population. Clearly the legislation in place with regard to disabled access is not being implemented and there is evidence of such on a nation-wide scale.

As we discussed in our last post, not only does the lack of disabled access throughout the UK and Ireland hinder the general day to day movements of our disabled public it has an added negative knock on affect across a number of areas which include but are not limited to education, personal growth and employment.

To build on the previous statement, out of those who were survey it was found that over 1.3 million disabled people are willing to and want to work. It was also found that while 80% of the physically able population are working, comparably only 50% of the disabled population are currently in employment. These are staggering statistics when broken down. Over half of the disabled population is currently unemployed compared to just under one fifth of those who are physically able. That is roughly 650,000 people who are willing and able to work but cannot, not because of the lack of want; rather it is due to the sheer neglect of establishments nationwide to adhere to the current disabled access legislation.

Not only does a severe lack of disabled access throughout the UK and Ireland pose employment problems for those who are disabled, it also seems to pose problems in terms of achieving the qualifications needed to gain this employment. Again, out of those surveyed there was a clear divide between those who had academic qualifications in both groups – 67% of disabled had academic qualifications, compared to 91% of those who were not disabled.

Once again, research has shown that the physically able are better off than those who are disabled.

When you break it down and look at the figure in more depth, you will see that the root of this inequality can be directly attributed to the severe lack of disabled access throughout both the UK and Ireland at present.

of disabled access throughout the UK and Ireland pose employment problems for those who are disabled, it also seems to pose problems in terms of achieving the qualifications needed to gain this employment. Again, out of those surveyed there was a clear divide between those who had academic qualifications in both groups – 67% of disabled had academic qualifications, compared to 91% of those who were not disabled.

Once again, research has shown that the physically able are better off than those who are disabled.

When you break it down and look at the figure in more depth, you will see that the root of this inequality can be directly attributed to the severe lack of disabled access throughout both the UK and Ireland at present.

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